Go Vote NOW! (Yes, we’re voting in MAY and yes, it’s important to HoustonISD families!)

May 6, 2017 is an election day!

Early voting starts today and you can find a polling locations HERE!

On May 6, HISD voters will be asked to decide how the district will pay its Recapture obligation to the state of Texas – by Purchasing Attendance Credits or through Detachment of Commercial Property.

Proposition 1 is IMPORTANT to HoustonISD families:  Authorizing the board of trustees of Houston Independent School District to purchase attendance credits from the State of Texas with local tax revenues.

From HISD:

What does your vote mean?
FOR
A vote FOR means Purchasing Attendance Credits by writing a check to the state for local property taxes.

It also means:
The district will continue to make annual recapture payments for the foreseeable future.
If our total tax collections continue to grow, they will help to offset these payments.
The district will have more capacity in the future to fund schools.

AGAINST
A vote AGAINST Purchasing Attendance Credits means Detachment of the most valuable non-residential, commercial properties from the district’s tax roll. The properties will be reassigned to other school districts for taxing purposes. It also means:

Under current law, those commercial properties will be permanently detached, and the district will permanently lose those tax collections for district operations.
The district will lose debt service tax collections used to pay back bonds, which is debt used to build schools.
The district will have less capacity to fund schools.

The video on HISD’s website explains this well… so watch that HERE!


Go Vote – Election Day is Today – November 6, 2012

If you did not do early voting, you need to go vote TODAY!  Unlike early voting, you must go to your assigned polling location.  Go HERE to locate it.

Why bother?  Without the vote, you do not get representation. The issues you care about will not be considered because the lawmakers do not depend on you to be re-elected. Political candidates know if you are a registered and an active voter, so if you want representation, the right to vote is not enough. You actually have to vote.

Yes, your preferred candidate may not win, but the elected official must consider the concerns of active voters, and active voting communities, if he or she wants to be re-elected.

And most importantly, your complaints over the next 4 years will only count if you make time to vote today!


Go Vote (And Then Play!) – Early Voting Ends Tomorrow, November 2, 2012

Early voting ends tomorrow, November 2, 2012.  Voting locations are open from 7:00am to 7:00pm.  Go get it done!

Any registered voter can go to any Houston voting location.  To find the location near you, check HERE.  You can take your kids and they are allowed to go to the booth with you.

If you go to the Metropolitan Multi-Services Center at 1475 West Gray, you can make it into a fun outing. One of my favorite Houston playgrounds is the Playground Without Limits.  Cast your vote, teach your kids a little about the political process, and then play like crazy.

We voted today.  At 3:00pm, parking was tight and there was a 20 minute wait.  I’m happy to see a big turn out for the elections but I suggest you try an off hour for the shortest line.  If you can only go after work, I know from past experience that if you get in line before the 7:00pm cut off, you will be allowed to vote.

Not sure why you should vote?  Go HERE and I’ll tell you!


Early Voting is Now Open! October 22 – November 2, 2012

 

There are a lot of good reasons to vote, but HISD might have just provided the best motivation to get out there for early voting from October 22 – November 2 or on the November 6 election day. Check out the video, encouraging your to vote early.  Go HERE to find an early voting location.

 

I’m sure you’ve heard about the upcoming presidential election. HISD also has a bond issue that, if approved, would rebuild or renovate 38 schools in neighborhoods across Houston, upgrade technology in all HISD classrooms, and more.

Why do you need to vote? Think back to high school history class. Women fought for 72 years before getting the right to vote in 1920. The women who started the movement, and dedicated their lives to women’s suffrage, died before the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which provided: “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” I personally feel obligated to vote because of the opportunity they gave me but never had for themselves.

Not enough? Without the vote, you do not get representation. The issues you care about will not be considered because the lawmakers do not depend on you to be re-elected. Political candidates know if you are a registered and an active voter, so if you want representation, the right to vote is not enough. You actually have to vote.

The issues of today have changed from 100 years ago, but the truth remains the same. If you want to influence public affairs, you have to vote. Yes, your preferred candidate may not win, but the elected official must consider the concerns of active voters, and active voting communities, if he or she wants to be re-elected.

The same goes for the HISD bond issue. If you want it, you need to vote. If you don’t want it, you also need to vote. And doesn’t this video get you excited to vote?!

If you still decide not to vote, be sure to mention that first before complaining about the election results!


HISD Encourages You to Vote Early – October 22 to November 2, 2012 – Gangham Style

 

There are a lot of good reasons to vote, but HISD might have just provided the best motivation to get out there for early voting from October 22 – November 2 or on the November 6 election day. Check out the video, encouraging your to vote early.

 

I’m sure you’ve heard about the upcoming presidential election. HISD also has a bond issue that, if approved, would rebuild or renovate 38 schools in neighborhoods across Houston, upgrade technology in all HISD classrooms, and more.

Why do you need to vote? Think back to high school history class. Women fought for 72 years before getting the right to vote in 1920. The women who started the movement, and dedicated their lives to women’s suffrage, died before the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which provided: “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” I personally feel obligated to vote because of the opportunity they gave me but never had for themselves.

Not enough? Without the vote, you do not get representation. The issues you care about will not be considered because the lawmakers do not depend on you to be re-elected. Political candidates know if you are a registered and an active voter, so if you want representation, the right to vote is not enough. You actually have to vote.

The issues of today have changed from 100 years ago, but the truth remains the same. If you want to influence public affairs, you have to vote. Yes, your preferred candidate may not win, but the elected official must consider the concerns of active voters, and active voting communities, if he or she wants to be re-elected.

The same goes for the HISD bond issue. If you want it, you need to vote. If you don’t want it, you also need to vote. And doesn’t this video get you excited to vote?!

If you still decide not to vote, be sure to mention that first before complaining about the election results!


Go Vote (Again) Houston!

 

We voted in November, but for those candidates that did not get more than 50% off the vote, we have a run off election in December. Early voting started today and goes through December 6.

The early vote locations are HERE.  Get out there and vote!


Vote Today! Polls are open until 7 pm.

Go HERE to find your polling location. Today is the last chance to vote.

Why do you need to vote? Think back to high school history class. Women fought for 72 years before getting the right to vote in 1920. The women who started the movement, and dedicated their lives to women’s suffrage, died before the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which provided: “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” I personally feel obligated to vote because of the opportunity they gave me but never had for themselves.

Not enough? Without the vote, you do not get representation. The issues you care about will not be considered because the lawmakers do not depend on you to be re-elected. Political candidates know if you are a registered and an active voter, so if you want representation, the right to vote is not enough. You actually have to vote.

The issues of today have changed from 100 years ago, but the truth remains the same. If you want to influence public affairs, you have to vote. Yes, your preferred candidate may not win, but the elected official must consider the concerns of active voters, and active voting communities, if he or she wants to be re-elected.

 


Go Vote! Houston Voting Locations for Tuesday 11/8/11

The official day to vote is tomorrow, Tuesday 11/8/11. Polls are open 7am to 7pm.

Your election day polling location can be found HERE.

This is the last day to vote, so get out there!


Have You Voted Yet? Houston Early Voting Hours and Locations

 

Have you voted yet? Early Voting began Monday, October 24th and goes until Friday, November 4th. I was able to walk right in at 11:00 and vote with no wait. If you are registered to vote, all you need is your drivers license. Go HERE to get the facts on voting, the propositions and the candidates.

The Early Vote schedule is as follows:

  • Monday, October 24th – Friday, October 28th: 8am to 4:30pm
  • Saturday, October 29th: 7am to 7pm
  • Sunday, October 30th: 1pm to 6pm
  • Monday, October 31st – Friday, November 4th: 7am to 7pm

Go HERE to see the early vote locations.

Why do you need to vote? Think back to high school history class. Women fought for 72 years before getting the right to vote in 1920. The women who started the movement, and dedicated their lives to women’s suffrage, died before the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which provided: “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” I personally feel obligated to vote because of the opportunity they gave me but never had for themselves.

Not enough? Without the vote, you do not get representation. The issues you care about will not be considered because the lawmakers do not depend on you to be re-elected. Political candidates know if you are a registered and an active voter, so if you want representation, the right to vote is not enough. You actually have to vote.

The issues of today have changed from 100 years ago, but the truth remains the same. If you want to influence public affairs, you have to vote. Yes, your preferred candidate may not win, but the elected official must consider the concerns of active voters, and active voting communities, if he or she wants to be re-elected.


My Big Kids (from Small City) Made it on TV!

 

Have you seen the commercial now on air? Check out the BigKidSmallCity staff!